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Get the Message: mRNA to Target Intracellular Aggregates

Several pharma companies are currently running clinical trials on damage-repair therapies targeting damaged forms of the protein tau to combat Alzheimer’s disease. But these AmyloSENS therapies only reach tau in the fluid outside of neurons, when what we need is to clear damaged tau inside of them. Fortunately, researchers are beginning to use mRNA — the same revolutionary biotechnology platform of the best COVID vaccines — to develop new LysoSENS therapies to do just that.

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Viva Viagra? Firmer Methodologies Needed

A recent preprint reports that use of Viagra and related drugs is associated with a lower mortality rate, raising hopes that it might be repurposed as a longevity therapeutic. Unfortunately, the methodology used in this and other recent studies is too weak to arouse too much excitement just yet.

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AmyloSENS Therapies for Alzheimer’s: The Marathon and the Decathlon

The Phase III trials for AmyloSENS rejuvenation biotechnologies lecanemab/Leqembi® and donanemab showed that they are most effective when given to people with less of other kinds of cellular and molecular aging damage in their brains. New data illustrates that fact even more powerfully and gives us a foreshadowing of what’s possible if we make best use of these and forthcoming damage-repair longevity therapeutics.

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Do the Hallmarks of Aging Make SENS? (Part Two)

A supporter asks if the Hallmarks of Aging could effectively be substituted for the seven categories of cellular and molecular damage in the SENS platform. The answer is ‘no,’ because the Hallmarks include both too much and too little, and most importantly because the Hallmarks fail to serve as a roadmap toward the biomedical postponement of aging.

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Blog

Do the Hallmarks of Aging Make SENS? (Part One)

A supporter asks if the Hallmarks of Aging could effectively be substituted for the seven categories of cellular and molecular damage in the SENS platform. The answer is ‘no,’ because the Hallmarks include both too much and too little, and most importantly because the Hallmarks fail to serve as a roadmap toward the biomedical postponement of aging.

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