Smart Bombs Against Senescent Cells

Posted by Michael Rae on November 09, 2018 | Senescent Cells

Summary: A new nanotechnology enables the selective targeting of senescent cells; in mice, it dramatically improves an age-related lung disease, and makes cancer chemotherapy safer and more effective. Now the scientists behind it have a startup and are headed toward human testing.

To Save Your Brain, Slay The Zombie (Senescent) Cells!

Posted by Michael Rae on April 09, 2018 | Chief Science Officer's Team

Michael Rae discusses the role of senescent cells in the brain during aging, and how eliminating those cells could prevent diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

Pathway To New Therapies

Posted by Michael Rae on March 12, 2018 | Chief Science Officer's Team

Article by Michael Rae about recent and forthcoming regulatory reforms required to support the testing of new therapies for Alzheimer's and other age-related diseases.

The Forever Healthy Foundation Fellowship in Rejuvenation Biotechnology

Posted by SENS Research Foundation on March 08, 2018 | SRF Research

In cooperation with the Forever Healthy Foundation, SENS Research Foundation (SRF) is inviting candidates to submit research proposals for a Fellowship in Rejuvenation Biotechnology at our Research Center (RC) in Mountain View, California.

Question Of The Month #16: Any Rejuvenation Relevance for Roundworm Reproduction?

Posted by Michael Rae on December 12, 2017 | Chief Science Officer's Team

Question Of The Month #16: Any Rejuvenation Relevance for Roundworm Reproduction? Part of Michael Rae's regular column from the Foundation's newsletter.

Human Trials of Two New Rejuvenation Biotechnologies Targeting Alpha-Synuclein

Posted by Michael Rae on June 30, 2017 | Extra/Intracellular Aggregates

Alpha-synuclein aggregates are a key form of aging damage in the brain, linked to a spectrum of symptoms in Parkinson's disease beyond the classic motor symptoms. The first amyloSENS-style immunotherapy to clear this pathology out of the brain was advanced into clinical trials by Austrian biotech firm AFFiRiS AG. Now two more such therapies have entered human testing. Although the trials are in their earliest stages, they bring the hope that this rejuvenation biotechnology will begin preventing and reversing Parkinson's disease and less specific disorders of aging soon.

Question of the Month #15: Would Other Rejuvenation Biotechnologies Keep Us Cancer-Free?

Posted by Michael Rae on October 12, 2016 | Chief Science Officer's Team

Question of the Month #15: Would Other Rejuvenation Biotechnologies Keep Us Cancer-Free? Part of Michael Rae's regular column from the Foundation's newsletter.

Question of the Month #13: How Can Thymic Regeneration Combat Age-Related Autoimmunity?

Posted by Michael Rae on February 19, 2016 | Chief Science Officer's Team

Question of the Month #13: How Can Thymic Regeneration Combat Age-Related Autoimmunity? Part of Michael Rae's regular column from the Foundation's newsletter.

Question of the Month #12: Energy-Carrying Molecules to Boost Aging Mitochondria?

Posted by Michael Rae on November 23, 2015 | Chief Science Officer's Team

Question of the Month #12: Energy-Carrying Molecules to Boost Aging Mitochondria? Part of Michael Rae's regular column from the Foundation's newsletter.

SRF-Funded Glucosepane Paper in Science

Posted by Jerri Barrett, VP of Outreach on October 16, 2015 | Outreach

Press Release: New Study Funded by SENS Research Foundation Sheds Greater Light on Diabetes and the Aging Process

Question of the Month #11: Are Mitochondrial Mutations Really All That Important?

Posted by Michael Rae on June 26, 2015 | Chief Science Officer's Team

Question of the Month #11: Are Mitochondrial Mutations Really All That Important? Part of Michael Rae's regular column from the Foundation's newsletter.

Question of the Month #10: Rejuvenation for calcification amelioration?

Posted by Michael Rae on April 30, 2015 | Chief Science Officer's Team

Question of the Month #10: Rejuvenation for calcification amelioration? Part of Michael Rae's regular column from the Foundation's newsletter.

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