Longevity and the genetic determination of collagen glycoxidation kinetics in mammalian senescence.

Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1996;93(1):485-490.

Longevity and the genetic determination of collagen glycoxidation kinetics in mammalian senescence.

Sell DR, Lane MA, Johnson WA, Masoro EJ, Mock OB, Reiser KM, Fogarty JF, Cutler RG, Ingram DK, Roth GS, Monnier VM.

Abstract

Abstract:

A fundamental question in the basic biology of aging is whether there is a universal aging process. If indeed such a process exists, one would expect that it develops at a higher rate in short- versus long-lived species. We have quantitated pentosidine, a marker of glycoxidative stress in skin collagen from eight mammalian species as a function of age. A curvilinear increase was modeled for all species, and the rate of increase correlated inversely with maximum life-span. Dietary restriction, a potent intervention associated with increased life-span, markedly inhibited glycoxidation rate in the rodent. On the assumption that collagen turnover rate is primarily influenced by the crosslinking due to glycoxidation, these results suggest that there is a progressive age-related deterioration of the process that controls the collagen glycoxidation rate. Thus, the ability to withstand damage due to glycoxidation and the Maillard reaction may be under genetic control.