Establishing good authentication practice (GAP) in secondary care to protect against falsified medicines and improve patient safety.

Eur J Hosp Pharm doi:10.1136/ejhpharm-2015-000750.

Establishing good authentication practice (GAP) in secondary care to protect against falsified medicines and improve patient safety.

Naughton BD, Smith JA, Brindley DA.

Abstract

Abstract:

Sustained growth of falsified and counterfeit medicines in the legal supply chain is a critical threat to patients, (bio)pharmaceutical companies, caregivers, payers and pharmacists. The European Union (EU) Falsified Medicines Directive (FMD) is a tractable opportunity to mitigate this threat and optimise healthcare delivery, including through the optimisation of pharmacy workflows and support of patient adherence. In order to deliver these benefits, and ensure FMD compliance, the production and regular review of Good Authentication Practice (GAP) guidelines is an essential step.